Secret Service hates photography?

The secret service asked a man outside a baseball stadium to delete a photo that included a security checkpoint at a game in which the President threw the first pitch.

The U.S. Secret Service may have overstepped its bounds by asking a man to delete a photograph of the entrance to a baseball stadium.
The U.S. Secret Service may have overstepped its bounds by asking a man to delete a photograph of the entrance to a baseball stadium. U.S. Secret Service

I don't know if it's silly that this surprises me, but apparently London's police aren't the only ones who have a problem with photography. According to a report on wusa9.com, the Web site of a local news station in Washington, the United States Secret Service asked a man outside the stadium of the Washington National's baseball team to delete a photo he took that included one of the stadium's security checkpoints. President George W. Bush was in the stadium to throw the first pitch for the team's opening day.

I know that a lot of people would think that the Secret Service's request is normal, but I also think that a lot of those same people might've wanted to take the same picture in that moment (you can see the entrance gate in the video on the wusa9.com site). Since the checkpoint includes a sign with the stadium's name, it would've been an easy way to show a friend the scene at the stadium that night. Interestingly, since the Secret Service's request had little legal merit, the video crew for the news station was able to film the security checkpoints and included the footage in the report they aired on television and which is now posted on the station's Web site. This is a touchy subject, especially since it involves the security of the president and isn't just about a photographer's rights in an everyday situation, but I see it as another example of the obstacles photographers face as they try to enjoy their hobby. Ultimately, the photographer has to stand up for their rights in that moment. When faced with someone who has the power to physically detain you if you refuse his request, however, I know I tend to comply.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments