Search and mix music tracks with Mix Turtle

What does this app bring to the table that other music search engines don't? Plenty.

New music search tool Mix Turtle is a very simple and elegant way to search for hosted music tracks. It provides search-as-you-type suggestions and a playlist creation tool that lets you add any search result to your mix just by clicking the big plus button next to it.

Like other music search engines, Mix Turtle provides variations on results if there are multiple sources. You can shuffle between each of these in succession and it will automatically jump to whichever one is still online since being indexed. It's not as elegant as mix tape creator MixWit's track surfer (which blends Seeqpod and Skreemr), but you can very quickly scour results and find what you're looking for.

Unfortunately, there are no real player controls that let you tweak things like a volume level or advance to a different part of the track, but you can simply pause it or jump to another track on your list with just a single click. Your playlist also stays with you from search to search, but remains out of sight. It can be summoned with a right click on your mouse.

Mix Turtle's database houses more than 2 million tracks. I was able to find some basic tracks from big bands with ease, including live tracks and remixes. For indie stuff you might be better off perusing eMusic's catalog.

See also: Songza, SeeqPod, Deezer, TinySong, and SkreemR.

Search for songs and add them to your playlist on the fly with Mix Turtle. CNET Networks
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About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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