Seagate says it now fixes 7200.11 drives for real

Company release new firmware that supposedly really fixes the problem and offers support for bricked hard drives due to the previous firmware.

This Seagate tool determines the model of the installed hard drive. Seagate

After releasing a bug-fixing firmware that actually caused havoc by potentially rendering some drives seemingly dead, Seagate on Thursday offered this statement:

Seagate has isolated a potential firmware issue in limited number of Barracuda 7200.11 hard drives and related SATA drives based on this product platform, manufactured through December 2008. In some unique circumstances, the data on the hard drives may become inaccessible to the user when the host system is powered on.

While we believe that the vast majority of customers will not experience any disruption related to this issue, as part of our commitment to customer satisfaction, Seagate is offering a free firmware upgrade to proactively address those with potentially affected products. This new firmware upgrade corrects compatibility issues that occurred with the firmware download provided on our support website on Jan. 16. We regret any inconvenience that the firmware issues have caused our customers.

You can go to this Web site to see if your hard drive is affected and download the new working firmware.

For owners of hard drives that are bricked due to the previous firmware, Seagate assures customers that the data still resides on the drive, there is no data loss associated with this issue, and the company is working with customers to expedite a remedy.

If you are among those concerned, you can e-mail Seagate at:

  • Americas: discsupport@seagate.com, disksupport@seagate.com
  • APAC: ssdc.apacsupport@seagate.com
  • EMEA: Euro.techsupport@seagate.com

Or you can call Seagate's support center at 1-800-Seagate (1-800-732-4283)

However, before anything and when it's still possible, make sure you make a backup of important data.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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