Seagate lays off 1,100 employees

Hard-drive maker lays off 1,100 employees, or 2.5 percent of its global workforce in an effort to save $120 million annually.

Seagate announced Thursday that it has initiated a restructuring plan that includes laying off approximately 1,100 employees, or 2.5 percent of the company's global workforce.

Seagate

According to the hard-drive maker, this reduction is required to support a targeted product development, marketing, and administrative costs of less than $300 million per quarter. In addition, it will also help position the company to be cash flow and earnings positive within its fiscal year 2010.

Seagate expects the layoffs to be completed by the end of July and result in total pretax restructuring charges of approximately $72 million. These charges, primarily incurred in the June 2009 quarter, consist mainly of cash-based employee termination costs, which are expected to be substantially paid in the September 2009 quarter.

All in all, the annual savings generated from this restructuring action is expected to be approximately $125 million.

This is the company's second round of layoffs. The first one was announced in January with about 800 people affected. Since then the company has been continuing to reduce its global headcount through attrition and restructuring, resulting in a reduction in the company's labor costs in excess of 25 percent.

Other than letting people go, Seagate has previously announced the realignment of its organizational structure to increase efficiency, including the closures of two recording media facilities and its Pittsburgh research facility, company-wide salary reductions, and other cost reduction initiatives.

Seagate's main competitor, Western Digital also laid off 2,500 employees back in December 2008, but the company reported positive earning with the net income of $50 million for for its fiscal third quarter that ended on March 27.

See the layoff scorecard for a list of tech companies that have reduced their workforce in recent months.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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