Seagate gives high-end Savvio HDD a speed boost

Seagate makes new SAS 2.0 2.5-inch hard drives for enterprise solutions.

Among hard drives for general consumers, Western Digital's Rapter Velocity drives have been well accepted to be the fastest. It's a different story in the enterprise market.

Seagate

On Monday, Seagate introduced its next generation of the Savvio HDD, called Savvio 15k.2, that, according to Seagate, is the world's fastest, greenest hard drive.

While the "greenest" notion is hard to determine, the new hard drive indeed has impressive specs. With the same form factor as a regular 2.5-inch laptop hard drive, the Savvio 15k.2 spins at 15,000rpm--high-end consumer HDDs generally spin at 7,200rpm--and features a SAS 2.0 interface. This allows the drive to offer speeds up to 6Gb per second. At this speed, the drive can read or write 768MB of data--that's more than enough to fill a CD-ROM--in one second.

The Savvio 15K.2 hard drive and the previously announced Savvio 10K.3 hard drive are both part of Seagate's new Unified Storage architecture, which makes hard drives faster and easier to work with.

The new hard drive is also the first small form factor 15,000 enterprise that uses Advanced Encryption Standard encryption for its self-encrypting feature. AES allows for protection of information throughout a drive's life cycle even when the drive is retired and leaves the data center.

The Savvio 15K.2 HDD is available in 146GB and 73GB versions. Thanks to small 2.5-inch form factor and built-in PowerTrim technology, according to Seagate, the new Savvio 15K.2 drives reduces power consumption up to 70 percent over comparable 3.5-inch 15,000rpm drives.

For now it's unclear how much the new drives cost, but you will soon find them in popular server computers, such as the HP Proliant or the Dell PowerEdge.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Delete your photos by mistake?

Whether you've deleted everything on your memory card or there's been a data corruption, here's a way to recover those photos.