Seagate boasts new family of hard drives

Seagate introduces Constellation family of hard drives that are available in 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch designs and SATA and SAS interfaces, and offer storage capacities up to 2TB.

Seagate claims that its all new family of hard drives offers the lowest power consumption and record-setting for any tier-two enterprise applications.

The new Seagate Constellation ES hard drive. Seagate

The Constellation family, as it's called, includes two models: the 2.5-inch Constellation and the 3.5-inch Constellation ES. Both drives also include PowerChoice from Seagate, which decreases power consumption by up to 54 percent, arguably the highest in the industry.

According to Seagate, the PowerChoice technology is designed to deliver the power-reduction savings without sacrificing performance and data integrity. In addition, the Constellation family features enterprise-grade reliability and is rated at a full 1.2 million hours of mean time between failures.

The Constellation 2.5-inch hard drive offers capacities of 160GB and 500GB with SATA2 and new SAS 2.0 interfaces that offer throughput speeds of 3Gbps and 6Gbps, respectively.

The 3.5-inch Constellation ES hard drive, on the other hand, will be available in 500GB, 1TB, and 2TB capacities. This drive also offers both SAS and SATA interfaces. Unlike Seagate's Savvio family of enterprise hard drives that spin at 10,000rpm or higher, the Constellation ES spins at only 7200rpm. However, it's the the first 3.5-inch hard drive that provides up to 2TB of storage, for now.

The new Constellation family features Seagate's unified storage architecture that converges advanced storage technologies including serial attached SCSI, small design, and self encryption into a powerful, yet simple, storage foundation.

Both the 2.5-inch Constellation and the 3.5-inch Constellation ES will be available in the third quarter of the year. Right now, it's unclear how much either will cost.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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