Scratch: Open-source programming for kids

Scratch gives kids a way to develop.

MIT

Peter Lofgren of Redpill (Sweden) sent over a link to Scratch, a cool open-source project from MIT Media Labs. The purpose? Make programming easy and approachable for kids as young as eight-years old. If the gallery of existing projects is any indicator, it seems to be working.

Scratch is a new programming language that makes it easy to create your own interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art -- and share your creations on the web. Scratch is designed to help young people (ages 8 and up) develop 21st century learning skills. As they create Scratch projects, young people learn important mathematical and computational ideas, while also gaining a deeper understanding of the process of design.

I like the fact that Scratch makes development easy, but it also teaches correct principles. As an open-source project, it teaches kids how to interact with the new world of open development. Anyone out there have kids that have used Scratch and can offer up a testimonial?

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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