SCO tries more open source: SCAMP

The SCO Group, reviled among open-source software aficionados for lawsuits alleging that Linux is filled with proprietary Unix technology, announced on Monday a new open-source software collection called SCAMP.

SCAMP is the Lindon, Utah-based company's take on a widely used open-source software collection called LAMP. LAMP combines Linux with the Apache Web server, MySQL database and the PHP, Perl or Python scripting languages; SCAMP substitutes SCO's Open Server version of Unix instead of Linux.

The product costs $999 for a license permitting five users to access the server, a price that includes one year of support for SCO OpenServer and MySQL database. SCO signed a support partnership with MySQL in September, a partnership that contrasted with its legal assertion that the General Public License (GPL) that governs MySQL is unconstitutional and violates various United States laws.

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About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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