Sanyo introduces 65-inch LCD TV for $998

The DP65E34 is the brand's newest model, offering a lot of screen for the buck.

sanyotv.jpg
The DP65E34 represents one of a new wave of inexpensive big-screen TVs. Sanyo

Yesterday Sanyo announced the DP65E34, a 65-inch LCD TV that's currently selling at Walmart for $998. That's a very low price, especially for this time of year, months from Black Friday and the traditional sale season.

On the other hand, there's no telling how good a TV the Sanyo is, and really, we don't expect much. The same price gets you a very capable 60-inch Sharp LC-60LE650U, a TV we do recommend.

But an extra five inches is nothing to sneeze at, and if you're focused on getting the biggest picture for your buck right now, it's tough to do better price-wise than this Sanyo in early spring. It undercuts the current Amazon price on Vizio's E650i-A2, for example, by about $250. The DP65E34 is a good example of the trend toward ever-larger, ever-cheaper TVs, and indeed most TV makers tell me the real growth is in sizes 60 inches and larger.

The DP65E34 has a 120Hz refresh rate, LED backlighting, three HDMI ports, and a USB photo viewer.

Along with the rest of Sanyo's new line, the set also offers MHL compatibility along with the Roku Ready branding. The latter means the TV is fully compatible with Roku's older MHL-specific streaming stick, to the extent that you can use the TV's remote to browse the service.

On the other hand, availability of newer, cheaper devices like the standard (HDMI-only) Roku streaming stick ($50), along with the Chromecast ($35), make Roku-readiness much less appealing.

Sanyo also announced smaller TVs from 24 to 58 inches. Along with the DP65E34, all are available today at Walmart and Sams's Club.

Featured Video
6
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

NYC taxis to compete with Uber

NYC taxis set to launch an app of their own, one billion people visit Facebook in a day, Chrome sets end date for Flash support and HTC's Vive VR headset gets delayed.

by Jeff Bakalar