Samsung X3 ultrathin notebook offers 9-hour battery

The X3 weighs under 4 pounds and offers a 14-inch screen, a dual-core Intel processor, and extra photo-based security.

Samsung X3 notebook
Samsung's X3 uses a six-cell battery to offer nine hours of battery life, or six hours when playing video. Erica Ogg/CNET

BERLIN--Most companies find one press conference sufficient at gadget shows. Not Samsung. We're here at the second Samsung announcement of the day, this time for its mobile computing division.

We'll update the post as we go. Seongwoo Nam, senior vice president of computer systems at Samsung, takes the stage first and offers brief details on a new notebook.

Called the X3, it has a 9-hour battery. It's an ultrathin, weighs just under 4 pounds, and has a 14-inch screen. The casing is matte and will come in pearl white, titanium silver, and pearl black. There will also be 15.6 inch and 11.6 inch versions.

The X3 in black. Erica Ogg/CNET

It will use an Intel processor, but Samsung won't reveal details besides that it is dual core.

The nine-hour battery life comes from a six-cell battery. For video playback, it will last six hours.

The X series notebooks will come integrated with HSPA wireless and also feature 3-in-1 memory card reader, 3 USB ports, VGA, and HDMI port. There's a security feature that takes a photo each time it starts up. If the picture is not the rightful owner, the computer will be disabled. The software also allows stolen computers to be locked down or data erased remotely.

The price range is 699 euros to 899 euros, or $1,000 to $1,300.

About the author

Erica Ogg is a CNET News reporter who covers Apple, HP, Dell, and other PC makers, as well as the consumer electronics industry. She's also one of the hosts of CNET News' Daily Podcast. In her non-work life, she's a history geek, a loyal Dodgers fan, and a mac-and-cheese connoisseur.

 

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