Samsung unveils 9 Series, a thin competitor to the MacBook Air

Samsung's razor-thin new portable aims to compete with the elite laptop crowd.

Getting sexy: Samsung's slim 9 Series laptop.
Getting sexy: Samsung's slim 9 Series laptop. Samsung
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LAS VEGAS--Samsung laptops have caught our eye for more than a year now, with an increasingly impressive design aesthetic and fairly good prices to boot. Today, its announcement of a thin, 13-inch laptop aimed squarely at the MacBook Air-loving crowd seems to indicate a direction in higher-end products, too, and we certainly can't complain.

The 9 Series comes with a second-generation Intel Core i5-2537M CPU, 4GB of DD43 RAM, and a 128GB solid-state drive, along with Windows 7 Professional. The design looks great so far: its metal finish has beautiful curved edges, and Samsung boasts it's the thinnest 13-inch laptop in existence. While specific dimensions weren't provided, it weighs 2.86 pounds. Despite its size, it also packs a 1.5-watt subwoofer and stereo speakers, too.

The Samsung 9 Series isn't cheap at $1,599, scraping the top of the high-end. However, it's nice to see laptops aiming to get sexy again, a trend seemingly lacking at this year's CES. With heated competition from tablets and smartphones bearing eye-popping designs, we're surprised more laptop manufacturers aren't following suit, albeit perhaps with something a bit more affordable.

Editor's Take: After playing a bit with the 9 Series hands-on at CES 2011, we found that it proved to be every bit the thin stylish showpiece we expected. The interior of the laptop has a plastic feel (duralumin, to be precise), encased in a thin sheath of metal on the outside. Two side panels flip down for port access. For the non-Apple crowd, this is as close to a MacBook Air as you're likely to get.

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About the author

Scott Stein is a senior editor covering iOS and laptop reviews, mobile computing, video games, and tech culture. He has previously written for both mainstream and technology enthusiast publications including Wired, Esquire.com, Men's Journal, and Maxim, and regularly appears on TV and radio talking tech trends.

 

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