Samsung to be fined $900 over fatal gas leak -- report

The company was allegedly late to report an acid leak that left one person dead and four others in the hospital, a Korean wire service reports. And yes, that's $900 -- as in, just shy of $1,000.

Samsung will be fined for belatedly reporting a fatal hydrofluoric gas leak at one of its Korean facilities to authorities, according to a new report.

The gas leak reportedly occurred sometime on Sunday (the exact timeline isn't clear, due to conflicting reports out of Korea) at a Samsung semiconductor facility south of Seoul. Several hours later, Samsung contacted crew members from a maintenance company to clean up the leak. Five crew members arrived on the scene and started to clean up the spill. However, one of the individuals, who was reportedly not wearing a full hazmat suit, died due to exposure. Four other individuals who were wearing their full protective gear were sent to a hospital, but fully recovered, according to reports.

Korea-based Yonhap News, citing sources within the police office assessing the fine, reported today that investigators have determined that Samsung took too long to alert law enforcement to the spill, and the company has been assessed a fine of up to 1 million Korean won (about $900).

For its part, Samsung has remained tight-lipped on the leak, but reportedly told Yonhap in a statement on Monday that it believed the leak was "minimal."

Samsung is one of the leading semiconductor makers in the world, and produces chips for a wide range of companies including Apple. It's not clear what processors were in production at the time of the accident.

CNET has contacted Samsung for comment on the news. We will update this story when we have more information.

(Via Engadget)

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