Samsung teases robotic vacuum cleaner with a twist

The consumer electronics giant shows off its latest robotic vacuum, and it's a dandy.

The little vacuum that could. Samsung

Samsung revealed yesterday (albeit, with little detail) its latest robotic vacuum cleaner -- the Smart Tango Corner Clean -- just a week before a potential CES debut.

For those of you with visions of a Samsung-made Rosey the maid robot from "The Jetsons" zipping about your home, well, we're not quite there yet. However, due to the inclusion of appendages, the latest robotic vacuum from Samsung might give pause to prospective buyers of Roomba or Neato devices.

According to Samsung, its newest disc-shaped sweeper contains a "world's first" in the form of two pop-out spinning brushes that extend outward from the device for supposedly improved corner cleaning. While many robotic vacuums offer built-in brushes at the base that work in a slightly similar fashion, it appears Samsung's version reaches out farther than the competition.

Samsung's foray into robotic vacuum cleaners might appear foreign to our U.S. readers; the company actually sells a range of such products in Europe (and elsewhere) under its NaviBot brand.

When comparing the two products, I noticed that the Smart Tango Corner Clean appears very similar in form and functionality to the various NaviBot devices -- minus the tiny arms. As evidenced by the related pictures, a camera is clearly visible on top of the device, as well as a variety of operational buttons and a built-in display for additional programming options. The camera on top most likely correlates to Samsung's Visionary Mapping System, which uses built-in optics to automatically create the most efficient path for cleaning floors.

Samsung may release prices and more details about the Smart Tango Corner Clean during a company event at CES in Las Vegas on January 8.

Samsung has teased several colors for the Smart Tango Corner Cleaner, including black, blue, and red. Samsung

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