Samsung serves up chef-designed home appliances

The Korean giant showed off its refrigerators, ovens, and more, and introduced its newest chef adviser, Daniel Boulud, at an event in New York.

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Samsung on Wednesday launched new appliances during an event in New York. Sarah Tew/CNET

NEW YORK -- Samsung on Wednesday showed off its chef-designed line of appliances as the company made its latest push to take over the US appliances market.

The appliances include dishwashers with new jets to direct the water flow to better clean dishes, refrigerators with improved temperature regulation and easier access to items on the shelf, and ovens that let people cook two different meals at two varying temperatures. In the case of the oven, Samsung announced an electric version earlier this year but expanded that Wednesday to include gas and induction models.

Tim Baxter, president of Samsung Electronics America, said the company's efforts have "enabled Samsung to be the fastest-growing appliances brand both here in the US and globally."

"Samsung is leading a global revolution in technology, design, and performance," Baxter said during an event in New York's Meatpacking neighborhood. "Samsung is always thinking about what's next."

Samsung initially announced its plans a year ago to work with world-famous chefs on creating new ovens, refrigerators, and other kitchen appliances. It then showed off those products in Januaryat the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

Electronics companies have been making home appliances for years, but the area is becoming an even bigger focus for many. Everything from washing machines to refrigerators are becoming smarter, with many incorporating processors and other technology that allows them to interact with smartphones and other devices. For example, people now can use their phones to remotely start their dryers or turn off their air conditioners.

The home is viewed by many as the next big battlefront for tech companies. Apple earlier this month announced at its Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco that it has added functionality in its upcoming release of iOS 8, through the HomeKit software platform, to integrate control for door locking, light dimming, and other home automation gadgets and features to iOS devices. And Google in January revealed plans to buy Nest Labs, the maker of the Learning Thermostat and the Protect smoke and carbon monoxide detector, for $3.2 billion in cash.

Samsung, which hopes to become the world's biggest home appliances maker by 2015, has made a big push of its own into the Internet of Things. The company in January unveiled a new foundation for the smart home that would allow users to manage all of their appliance and devices through a single application. One of Samsung's appliances that brings together its various businesses is a refrigerator with an LCD screen on the side that connects with mobile devices to browse the Web and access apps. The company talked up the product on Wednesday.

A year ago, Samsung introduced a new partnership with Michelin-starred chefs, called the Club des Chefs, to design new kitchen appliances. The initial club members included Christopher Kostow of The Meadowood in Napa Valley, Calif.; Eric Trochon of Semilla in Paris; and Michel Troisgros of Maison Troisgros in Roanne, France. Other recent additions include Eric Frechon of the restaurant Épicure at the Hôtel Le Bristol in Paris and Davide Oldani, the owner and chef of the restaurant D.O. in Milan. Samsung also announced Tuesday that Daniel Boulud, of New York's Daniel and Bar Boulud, would join the Club de Chefs.

Corrected at 8:30 p.m. PT to fix the first name of Daniel Boulud in the dek, and 9 a.m. PT on June 12 to fix the name of Christopher Kostow's restaurant.

 

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