Samsung Galaxy S5 may sport fingerprint sensor, says analyst

A new report claims the company's next flagship phone will compete directly with Touch ID on Apple's iPhone 5S.

An analyst predicts that the Galaxy S5 will have a fingerprint sensor to compete with Apple's Touch ID. Scott Stein/CNET

Samsung thinks the Touch ID feature in the iPhone 5S is a pretty nifty idea worth including in its upcoming Galaxy S5, if a note from a Chinese analyst with a pretty solid track record of predicting upcoming smartphone features (including Touch ID) turns out to be accurate.

KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo is predicting that the Galaxy S5 will also debut with a fingerprint sensor, according to a research note obtained by AppleInsider.

"Fingerprint is necessary for a star model," Kuo writes. "Even (if it) is not as mature as the iPhone 5S's."

Kuo believes that Samsung feels pressure from both the iPhone 5S and the fingerprint-reading HTC One Max to include the feature. This is interesting, considering that a Samsung executive mentioned that the company was looking at iris-scanning security technology earlier this month.

Kuo does not see Samsung trying to match Appe's 64-bit processors, however, predicting that Galaxy S5 models will use 32-bit hardware from Qualcomm or Exynos instead. He also backs up the rumors we've been hearing about a standard and premium edition of the Galaxy S5, but mentions nothing of the possibility that one could come with a metal body as other reports have mentioned.

Plastic cases aside, given the Korean company's habit of trying to be all things to all customers in offering its devices in a wide array of shapes, sizes, and models, perhaps Galaxy S5 owners will have the opportunity to chose between a phone that knows you by the soft touch of a finger or by staring deeply into your eyes. Or maybe the Galaxy S5 will just go the distance and make Scarlett Johansson a part of TouchWiz.

 

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