Roswell watch: Time for the Truth?

We're not exactly sure what the latest from Romain Jerome's Moon Dust-DNA series has to do with, but we assume it's UFOs.

Roswell Truth Watch
Are we seeing things or are those little alien skeletons popping up from the watch face? And tire treads? Are those tire treads? A Blog to Read

We're not really sure what truths the "Truth About Roswell" watch conveys, but they appear to have something to do with the legendary discovery in that small New Mexico town of what some insisted were remnants of a UFO. Look closely, after all, and the watch face resembles a mini archaeology site with its cute little alien-ey skeletons and artifacts (gears? screws?) popping up from a cratered dirt-like surface.

Roswell Truth Watch
A Blog to Read

This limited-edition (nine in all) timepiece is another in Geneva-based Romain Jerome's series of Moon Dust-DNA watches, which honor the space race with lunar dials based on a mineral deposit that supposedly includes real moon dust and have hands inspired by Sputnik antennas.

Given the design tack of incorporating real historical remnants into modern-day watches, we're assuming the Truth About Roswell (cue "Close Encounters" theme music) includes at least a speck or so of genuine debris from the Roswell site that has led to so much rumor and speculation over the years. Or maybe it's just another of the gazillion curios that have popped up around Roswell's alien-mad tourist culture.

In addition to unique lunar dials, Moon Dust-DNA watches have cases, straps, and steel paws imbued with fragments from the Apollo XI and Soyuz spacecraft, as well as the International Space Station and fibers from a spacesuit worn during the ISS mission. The watches sell for up to half a million dollars, which fortunately includes a legal document certifying the authenticity of the materials involved.

The Moon Dust-DNA series follows "Titanic DNA," an earlier entrant in Romain Jerome's DNA of Famous Legends collection. Those watches were made from steel and coal from the ocean liner that famously sunk on its maiden voyage in 1912.

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Point-and-shoot quality with your phone?

Upgrade your camera photo game with these great additions.