Robotic lawn mower cuts the rug

After spending a good part of this past weekend planting, watering and fertilizing delicate new saplings, I'm not so sure I'd want to let Ambrogio's Evolution robotic lawn mower loose in my garden.

Then again, I'm kind of overprotective when it comes to plants. No one touches my dahlias but me.

Those gardeners who feel OK letting others tend to their greenery, on the other hand, might like to know about the $2,299.99 fully autonomous bot, which shifts into mowing mode when it senses long grass, according to the product's Web site.

Evolution lawn mower
Credit: Ambrogio

The gizmo can freely move within an enclosed area, detecting the signal transmitted by the perimeter cable located on the ground around the area to be mowed. It can also work without a perimeter cable as long as the working area is enclosed by a fence at least 10 cm (4 inches) high.

When work autonomy has expired, the robot shuffles over to the base to automatically recharge the lithium batteries. Once that's done, the machine starts mowing again.

Ambrogio, a maker of indoor and outdoor sweat-savers, says the Evolution, which is equipped with a keyboard and display, can traverse 27-degree hills without losing power or tipping over. We're also happy to hear that if the robot is lifted or overturned, the blade stops to prevent hazards to people and/or pets.

And roses to GadgetryBlog for tipping us off to the latest in don't-do-it-yourself home labor.

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

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