RFID goes prime time in Beijing Olympics

Radio frequency identification technology will be taking care of ticketing for the estimated 3 million athletes, journalists, and spectators.

Olympics ticket
Beijing2008.cn

Radio frequency identification technology will be facing one of its first major tests during the Beijing Olympics, taking care of ticketing for the estimated 3 million athletes, journalists, and spectators. Despite the Chinese government's current uptight security measures, the RFID chips embedded in Olympics tickets will be not carrying personal information. Instead, they'll be linked to a remote database, designed primarily to combat counterfeits, facilitate check-in, and so on.

Following the recent food scare originating from China, local authorities will also be using an RFID-based food management system to maintain close tabs on food production, processing, and deliveries. The arrangement may be a lot more significant than the one mentioned above, considering the well-being of close to 10,700 international athletes and the daunting logistics of pulling off events across 31 competition venues throughout the country.

(Via Crave Asia)

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    Philip Wong is an A/V, PC, photography and gaming enthusiast. Besides spending countless days and late nights fiddling with his home theater system and watercooled PC, he also hits the roads frequently on his iron horse to sweat it out. Now, who says geeks don't work out?

     

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