Researchers whittle 'world's thinnest' metal lines

Scientists in Singapore, Britain, and South Korea say they've succeeded in creating metallic lines so thin and smooth they can only be seen using electron microscopes.

Microscope

A group of international scientists have collaborated to create what they say is the "world's thinnest" and smoothest metallic lines which are used in electronic components. The technological breakthrough will aid in future miniaturization of devices, they say.

Singapore's Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE) said Tuesday that scientists from IMRE, the University of Cambridge in the U.K., and Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea have succeeded in creating metallic lines so thin and smooth that they can only be seen using electron microscopes.

This breakthrough was achieved through "material and technique," IMRE explained, where researchers used organo-metallic material made up of a metallic and organic component, and applied a combination of electron beam lithography and subsequent gas treatment to chip away organic portions in a uniform manner.

Read more of "'World's thinnest' metal lines to spur device miniaturization" at ZDNet Asia.

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