Reporters' Roundtable: What Spotify means to the music industry

Root Music CEO J Sider and Evolver.fm's Eliot Van Buskirk join Rafe to discuss how the music industry has changed for performers, and what all the new digital services mean for them.

Big news in music this week: Spotify launched ! It's been called iTunes with all the songs already bought. What's the big deal? What other startups or services are changing the music industry? And how is the industry changing for musicians? That's what we're talking about today with two influential experts in the field.

First, J Sider, the CEO of Root Music, the company behind BandPages, the music app for bands on Facebok.

Second, via Skype, Eliot Van Buskirk, editor of Evolver.fm and analyst at the music services company Echonest.

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Some of our discussion points

How did musicians make money 15 years ago, compared to now?

Isn't the idea of "the music" industry thoroughly modern, dependent on changing laws and technology? Why do people get so bent out of shape when this relatively new industry shifts?

What is the big deal with Spotify? What's mean for musicians?

Compare Other infinite jukeboxes: Pandora, Rhapsody, Grooveshark, Mog, Napster, Zune Pass.

Let's talk about the role of radio today.

Apple's role? Will consumers pay subscription fees for music? The culture of media ownership: Is it changing? What does that mean for content creators?

Let's talk about the other model, "internet radio," eg Pandora, Last.fm (CBS co), Slacker radio. How about real radio: What's happening to it?

What's the big deal with Turntable.fm?

What's happening at the RIAA

Finally: Any recommendations for up-and-coming bands?

Wrap-up
Follow me on Twitter for more news on Reporters' Roundtable. E-mail roundtable@cnet.com with your ideas for shows!

 

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