Report: Russia passes China to become malware leader

In soon-to-be-released report, PC Tools says the two produce more than half the world's malicious code, while about 10 percent is generated in the U.S.

Russia has passed China to become the largest generator of spyware and other malicious code, according to a report set to be released on Friday.

PC Tools

Security software maker PC Tools says that Russia now accounts for 27.9 percent of such software, compared with China's 26.5 percent. The U.S., which had been the second largest producer in prior surveys, is now in third place, accounting for a hair less than 10 percent of malware.

Russia is also known as a hotbed for junk e-mail, known as spam.

PC Tools said that the death of Russian Business Network, a well-known malicious software distributor, has not slowed that country's production of malicious code.

"The vacuum left by the RBN has been filled by other malware distributors," PC Tools malware analyst Sergei Shevchenko said in a statement. "The bottom line is that there are more viruses and spyware coming out of Russia now than ever before and the complexity of this malware is also increasing."

In fact, he said, the now-defunct organization was easier to track than the smaller outfits that are filling its shoes. "Now we are seeing Russian malware hosting services being advertised for servers in Malaysia, China, Panama, Singapore, Thailand, Turkey and India."

For-profit attacks have been on the rise, particularly those targeted at small groups or individuals.

Below is a list of the top 10 malware-producing countries, while PC Tools has an interactive world map on its site.

1. Russia - 27.89 percent

2. China - 26.52 percent

3. United States - 9.98 percent

4. Brazil - 6.77 percent

5. Ukraine - 5.45 percent

6. United Kingdom - 5.34 percent

7. France - 3.81 percent

8. Germany - 2.14 percent

9. Sweden - 1.6 percent

10. Spain - 1.37 percent

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    During her years at CNET News, Ina Fried has changed beats several times, changed genders once, and covered both of the Pirates of Silicon Valley. These days, most of her attention is focused on Microsoft. E-mail Ina.

     

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