Report: Motorola iPhone 4 killer in the works

Motorola is looking to trump the iPhone 4 by raising the performance bar for high-end Android smartphones, according to a report.

Motorola is looking to trump the iPhone 4 by raising the performance bar for high-end Android smartphones, according to a report.

Sanjay K. Jha, CEO, Motorola's Mobile Devices and Home business division, says future smartphones will replace laptops. Motorola

Conceivably Tech, a technology blog, cited general comments about the future phone from Sanjay Jha, the CEO of Motorola's Mobile Devices Division, who was speaking at the Executives Club of Chicago Wednesday.

The report went on to say that another Motorola executive, "who asked to remain anonymous," said that the phone would include "everything that is technologically possible in a smartphone today" and will be based on Android, like the current Motorola Droid. Unlike the Droid, it will pack an Nvidia processor and integrate a gyroscope--like the iPhone 4.

The Nvidia chip will support full Flash 10.1 hardware acceleration, a feature the iPhone notoriously lacks.

In January, Nvidia announced its Tegra 250 processor which is a cutting-edge dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor running at speeds of up to 1.0 GHz--and one of the first dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processors. It is not clear if the future Motorola phone would use this chip or a future Nvidia Tegra processor.

What is clear is that future smartphones packing dual-core processors will be powerful devices. Along these lines, Jha talked about his vision for mobile devices, predicting that within two years many companies will give their employees smartphones instead of laptops, as smartphones take on many of the attributes of mobile computers, according to the report, which was also later blogged about by CNET's Bonnie Cha .

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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