Report: Intel Core 2 Duo, Celeron coming

Intel is slated to bring out Core 2 Duo E8300 processor in April and a E7200 and a new Celeron in May.

Intel is expected to bring out new Core 2 Duo processors and a Celeron in the April-May time period, according to Chinese-language Web site HKEPC. These are minor models that do not constitute a major model rollout like the mobile Montevina processors due late spring or early summer.

HKEPC cites motherboard manufacturers as the source for this information.

New processors include the 45-nanometer 2.83-GHz Core 2 Duo E8300 (6MB L2 cache/1333-MHz front-side bus), priced at $163, the 2.53-GHz Core 2 Duo E7200 (3MB cache/1066-MHz FSB), priced at $133, and the 2.0-GHz Celeron E1400 (512K cache/800-MHz FSB), priced at $53. The E8300 is due in April, while the E7200 and E1400 are due in May.

Intel wafer with 45-nanometer die
Intel wafer with 45-nanometer die Intel Corp.

The bigger roll-out will be the "Centrino 2" 45nm Montevina chips, according to a recent report from Taipei-based DigiTimes. This new family of processors will include the Core 2 Extreme QX9300 (12MB L2 cache, 45W), Core 2 Duo T9600 (2.8 GHz, 6MB, 35W), and P8400 (2.26 GHz, 3MB, 25W), according to a separate report last month from DigiTimes. All processors will support a 1066-MHz front-side bus.

The 22mm sq. Intel CPUs--the same compact design used in the MacBook Air--will include the SP9400 (2.4 GHz, 6MB, 25W) and low-power SU9400 (1.4 GHz, 3MB, 10W). The 10W processors will support FSB speeds up to 800MHz.

For the most part, Intel has made public the details of Montevina mobile chip technology: the processors will be paired with the Cantiga GM and PM chipsets and Echo Peak silicon, a Wi-Fi and WiMax "combo module." WiMax, when the infrastructure is in place, will allow high-speed, long-range wireless broadband access.

An update to Turbo Memory, a technology for speeding hard drive data access, will also be offered. Last month, CEO Paul Otellini said that Montevina processors are already in production.

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About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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