Rent your house or couch by the day with AirBed & Breakfast

Tool is set up like a hotel booking service, enabling people in need of a place to stay an easy way to browse open accommodations by city.

While not a new idea, AirBed & Breakfast is a fun approach to couch surfing--a time honored tradition that encourages resource sharing between travelers who need a place to stay for a night or two, and people with open couches or a spare room.

The tool is set up like a hotel booking service, allowing people in need of a place to stay an easy way to browse open accommodations by city. As a host you can have people in your house as long as you'd like and set a fee per night or for a specific amount of time. The site also lets you post pictures, list amenities, and note all the little important things like pets, smoking, and whether you'll have a meal ready in the morning (part of the "breakfast" in the moniker).

The service is making its cash by charging a $5 booking fee per night. Otherwise, the rest of the money goes straight to the host and goes through an online payment system so there's no need to deal with cash or check transactions in person. The site was started by a couple of San Francisco locals who took advantage of so many conferences taking place in the area and the need of local conference goers for one or two days' lodging.

[via eHub]

Related: Rent your stuff to strangers with Zilok

Through AirBed & Breakfast, users can see what's available in a certain area and rent a place for a few days. CNET Networks
Tags:
Software
About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Up for a challenge?

Put yourself to the real tech test by building your own virtual-reality headset with a few household items.