Red Hat makes the planes fly on time in Munich

Open source is powering the ground and air systems at Munich Airport in Germany.

I spent my lunch today in Buenos Aires with Red Hat's general manager of South America, which I'll report on tomorrow. Meanwhile, on the other side of the planet, Red Hat announced a cool deal with Munich Airport, thrice-named "Airport of the Year" in Europe.

Why? Because Unix couldn't deliver the performance that Munich Airport needed, so the organization went with Red Hat Enterprise Linux to "provide both the savings and performance benefits desired." Thirty servers and 40 desktops later, Munich Airport is running smoothly and at lower cost than before.

While this may not sound like a lot of servers and desktops, it's important to remember their purpose: keep air and ground traffic running efficiently and productively. In other words, it's true mission-critical deployment, however small.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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