Quaker Oats gets a Web 2.0 makeover

Being in marketing in the age of Web 2.0 means one thing: Your logo better not be old-school. Visitors to the Yay Hooray! online forum--which calls itself "arguably the best Web site ever"--created a humorous thread that displayed their visions for the future, with different users taking outdated logos and Web 2.0-ifying them.

The creators took the original logos and made them lighter, gave them bolder fonts and created rounder, more bubble-shaped designs. And, in true Web 2.0 fashion, most logos were given a drop shadow or a mirror image. Also, many logos that end in the letter "r" had the last vowel taken out, as in the case of the new "Quakr 2.0ats" logo, which included a modern-looking Quaker, and was my absolute favorite design.

Quaker Oats logo
Credit: Yay Hooray!

The creators intended to poke fun at the commonalities between all Web 2.0 logos, and they met their objective. According to the thread, a few companies even asked members of YH to help with their logo designs after seeing the designers' raw talent. In any case, members of the forum created new logos for transportation and credit card companies, fast-food places, TV networks, stores and even a more advanced logo for the United Nations. Some of my favorites were the Goodwill logo, featuring the organization's signature smiley face, but this time on a green background, with a drop-shadow-type effect at the base.

I also liked the Audi logo, where the creator changed the four rings to be multicolored instead of the current four silver rings. Even Louis Vuitton got a makeover. I can see it now: the new Web 2.0 handbag collection.

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    Sabena Suri
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