Preserve Kitchen offers bright eco-friendly choices

Recycline expands Preserve line of environmentally friendly products into the kitchen. Uses bright colors for cutting boards, colanders and food storage bowls.

Preserve line of environmentally friendly products. Recycline

Festive colors adorn the Preserve line of kitchen products. With fun colors such as Milk White, Berry Blue, Apple Green, and Ripe Tomato, these items are sure to jazz up your kitchen. Turns out, while you're spicing up your kitchen, you're helping the environment too.

Recycline, as the name suggests, is a manufacturer that relies on Earth-friendly, recyclable materials. All of their Preserve products are made from 100 percent recycled plastics or 100 percent post-consumer paper. By using recycled materials, the company is helping to preserve natural resources and create an incentive for communities to recycle.

From simple beginnings in 1996 and with a toothbrush made from recycled plastic, Preserve has grown and expanded into the kitchen. Currently, beyond tableware and personal care items, (such as toothbrushes) they offer colanders, cutting boards and food storage bowls.

The 3.5-quart colanders are available in four colors, and are shaped in a familiar and useful double handle form with large holes for easy draining. The bowls are available in two sizes, are stackable, and feature screw top lids. Both the colanders and the bowls are dishwasher safe and made from 100 percent recycled plastic. They are even recyclable in communities with No. 5 recycling.

Two different types of cutting boards are available from the company, in either plastic or paper-based forms. The plastic cutting boards come in the four familiar colors and are dishwasher safe. The other cutting boards are made from 100 percent post-consumer recycled paper into Forest Stewardship Council certified Paperstone. Available in Olive Black or Pesto Green, the cutting boards offer two stylish choices that won't hurt your knives--or the environment.

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