Powermat charging system took my iPod Touch hostage

The Powermat system is indeed very cool, but the problem with the product should have been evident from the drawing board: it doesn't fill a need, and comes off like a proof-of-concept product.

Powermat
Powermat

I originally planned on writing my review of the Powermat magnetic inductive charging system by highlighting the innovation in the technology and the lack of necessity for a product that costs a serious amount of coin--$99.99 for the wired mat plus $40 for the charger--for achieving the same goal as a simple wire.

But then the Powermat took my iPod Touch captive.

First, the straight shooting: the Powermat system is indeed very cool. It does what it advertises and brings "wire-less" charging to devices that normally don't have the ability: the iPhone, iPod Touch, select RIM BlackBerry models, and so forth.

But the problem with the product should have been evident from the drawing board: it doesn't fill a need, and comes off like a proof-of-concept product. Sure, "wire-less" charging is neat to observe, but you're buying a boatload of equipment (a mat that comes with wired adapter, plus device-specific "receiver") for the price of a new smartphone on contract to replace something that took a moment to achieve in the first place.

Read more of "How the cordless Powermat charging system took my iPod Touch hostage" on ZDNet's The Toy Box.

About the author

    Andrew Nusca is the editor of SmartPlanet and an associate editor at ZDNet. He has written for New York, Men's Vogue, Popular Mechanics, and Money. He is based in New York.

     

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