Power plug disconnects on its own

A student at the Rhode Island School of Design has come up with an ingenious way to prevent unnecessary overcharging.

Conor Klein

Conor Klein, a furniture design student at the Rhode Island School of Design, was inspired by a leech to come up with an ingenious way to prevent unnecessary overcharging. When a device reaches full power, most modern adapters will switch to a trickle charge mode that continues to supply electricity to the machine at a slower rate. Over time, this will reduce the life of the battery and waste electricity.

Klein's Outlet Regulator design is unique in that it comes in two parts--a main unit plugged in to the outlet and a secondary wire to which a device is plugged in. Using a combination of a timer circuit and electromechanics (the exact mechanism was not detailed), the wire will eject from the plug when the device detects a full charge. You can check out a video demo below.

Outlet Regulator Video from conor klein on Vimeo.

A concept for now, we think this is a splendid idea as long as it works as advertised. After all, there is nothing worse than heading out, only to find your mobile phone has just a bar left of charge.

(Source: Crave Asia)

 

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