Portable teppanyaki grill takes the cooking to the people

Teppanyaki grill has a unique curving surface for cooking anything from hearty street food to delicate fish and skewers.

Imagine the possibilities. Cook-N-Dine

There are lots of foods that benefit from being prepared on a flattop grill. While this Portable Teppanyaki Grill from Cook-n-Dine may have Japanese food at the heart of its design, the reality is anything can be prepared with ease and delicious results.

I have in mind one particular street food of which I happen to be fond: the bacon-wrapped hot dog. Hot dog carts selling these tubes of pork delight have been gaining in popularity in recent years. (I first remember seeing them in Mexico many years ago, but that's a different story.) However, creating the ultimate form of the hot dog as it was meant to be enjoyed is not as easy as it looks. Upon frying some up, I realized that the fat would collect in the pan, creating an even greasier dog (not to mention unevenly cooked). The next time I found a hot dog cart I took a closer look and realized that the grill actually bent down, allowing for different cooking zones on one cooking surface. The fat would puddle in one specific place, and the hot dog could be moved accordingly.

So what do bacon-wrapped hot dogs and a portable teppanyaki grill have to do with each other? Only that this grill truly spans international borders, as it would be the perfect device for cooking up a batch. You see, besides being portable and all, the center bows down when hot--so all those delicious juices are collected into one spot! To further the degree of control, the temperature selector allows for heating from 120° F up to 430° F. With such precise cooking ability, people of any nationality will find a use for this grill.

(Via Appliancist)

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