Porn on large screen TVs shocks at Best Buy

Police are investigating how pornography was played on 55-inch TV screens at a Best Buy in Greenville, S.C. The store claims its Wi-Fi was infiltrated.

Screenshot: Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

There has been a disturbance at one of your favorite gadget stores. A serious disturbance.

After years of wandering into Best Buys and seeing anodyne programming on all its large televisions, please imagine how customers at the branch in Greenville, S.C., might have felt when they were confronted with porn.

As the local CBS Channel 7 displays it, startled families were positively goggling with shock when a porn movie appeared on some of the store's 55-inchers.

The outrage must have been heard at the very least in the Carolina to the north. And, perhaps, Brazil to the south.

Gloria Berg was there with her children and told Channel 7: "I think even the word 'pornographic' doesn't cover it. I have never watched pornography, so I don't know what else you can see there, but to me, I really felt extremely violated."

It is an accepted fact that parents don't watch pornography. However, one wonders precisely what might have truly been screened in order to offend someone who has never chosen--or, perhaps, dared--to watch men and women in some sort of naked filmic conflagration.

Clearly, there appears to have been some mischief here.

Berg claims that the porn was up for several minutes. But, more disturbingly, she reportedly said the manager had told her the same thing had happened the evening before.

Best Buy, for its part, commented: "Two individuals accessed our store's wireless signal to broadcast inappropriate content on a smart television display. In both cases, we worked immediately to disable the inappropriate content. We greatly apologize for this unfortunate incident and we are working to ensure that it does not happen again."

I feel confident that no Google Street View cars were involved in this alleged Wi-Fi misappropriation.

Perhaps, though, there might be some legal conundrums here. The images would have to be seen by the authorities in order for an assessment to be made as to whether they were, indeed, pornographic.

Police have said they are investigating and will, in part, be wondering why Best Buy's Wi-Fi might be so easy to break into.

Some might wonder whether the alleged pranksters have something against this particular Best Buy. Might it be possible that these jokesters were in the store to witness the fruits of their work? Or might there be some other explanation that will soon emerge?

In the meantime, parents should naturally only venture to the Best Buy TV department alone. You simply never know what you might find there.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best tech products of 2014
Does this Wi-Fi-enabled doorbell Ring true? (pictures)
Seven tips for securing your Facebook account
The best 3D-printing projects of 2014 (pictures)
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)