Plastic tube keeps cable clutter in line

A simple piece of plastic promises to tidy up your desk. It also shows that sometimes function follows form.

cable minder propping up tablet
See your tablet's screen without having to look at your tablet's cable. David Lazar

Most of us live with some amount of cable clutter--it's a fact of contemporary life. There are numerous cable minders, and many desktop monitors have them built in. Still, it's nice to see an elegant solution, especially one that doubles as a tablet or smartphone stand.

Cable.Gone's shape and materials set it apart from other cable minders. It's a slanted, rubberized plastic tube with open ends and a couple of holes in the middle. Cables can run from one end to the other or from either end to the middle. Running cables through Cable.Gone is an easy way to consolidate cables, save desk space, and reduce visual clutter.

Cable.Gone's cross-section is hexagonal, with one side lower than the other so the top surface is slanted. The slant is useful for propping up tablets and smartphones at an angle that makes them easier to see and type on. The bottom surface has a slot that makes it easy to insert cables. The tube is made of a rigid plastic with a rubberized outer surface, which helps hold tablets and smartphones in place.

"Inspiration to design Cable.Gone came from my own working space," said David Lazar, Cable.Gone's designer. "It was easier for me to concentrate on important stuff when my desk was organized."

cable minder
David Lazar

Lazar and business partner Ryan McNab have launched a Kickstarter campaign to get Cable.Gone into production. Supporters in the U.S. who prepay for the gizmo will get free shipping if the campaign reaches its goal of $27,500.

Cable.Gone measures 13 inches long, 1.25 inches high, and a little over 2 inches wide and comes in white, blue, and magenta. The white model is priced at $25; the color models are $29. The price seems a bit steep, but perhaps not out of line for a two-person startup. Considering that many phones, tablets, and computers are black, I'd like to see a black version. Quibbling aside, this looks like a nice piece of design.

(Via Trend Hunter)

About the author

    Crave freelancer Eric Smalley has written about technology for more than two decades. His freelance credits include Discover, Scientific American, and Wired News. He edits Technology Research News, where he gets to preview the cool technology we'll all be using 10 years from now. Eric is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CBS Interactive. E-mail Eric.

     

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