Photoshop supports 5D Mark II, camera profiles

Adobe's software now can process raw images from Canon's new full-frame SLR. For everyone else, gets support for camera profiles that improve colors.

Adobe Systems on Monday updated its raw-image processing software for Photoshop CS4 with support for Canon's higher-end EOS 5D Mark II camera and building in support for the camera profiles that can give images more realistic colors.

Canon's 5D Mark II
Raw image files from Canon's EOS 5D Mark II now is supported by Adobe Photoshop. Canon

The camera profiles, which I strongly recommend people employ, let you change image tones and colors to better match camera settings such as neutral, portrait, and landscape. They'd been released on the Adobe Labs site, but now are officially built into the Adobe Camera Raw 5.2 software and an accompanying utility, DNG Converter for changing cameras' proprietary raw files into Adobe's Digital Negative format.

The support for Canon's new 5D Mark II SLR is arriving just in the nick of time for the camera itself. Photographer and blogger Rob Galbraith, citing the company, Canon will begin shipping the new cameras to U.S. dealers on Tuesday. The $2,700, 21-megapixel camera, with a full-frame sensor the size of a frame film and a 1080p high-definition video mode, will help Canon counter Nikon's increasingly competitive models, and it's a hotly anticipated model.

The new raw software also supports several higher-end compact cameras: Canon PowerShot G10 , Panasonic DMC-G1, Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX150, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3, and Leica D-LUX 4, Adobe said. Additionally, people can save adjustment settings for future use.

The software (for Mac OS X or Windows) can be downloaded from Adobe's Web site.

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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