Pellet grill helps us shake off the frost

The Memphis Wood Pellet Grill uses a temperature control system to precisely monitor cooking times. Automatically adding fuel to the fire when needed, the grill makes it easy to cook in a traditionally unpredictable environment.

Warm weather means grilled goodies.
Warm weather means grilled goodies. Williams-Sonoma

As we stagger out of our man-made caves, ready to greet the changing season, we emerge hungry--hungry for the grill. While the winds of change may carry us outside and straight to the grill, they also bring with them uncertainty. Not only do we find ourselves out of practice cooking over a fire, but also subject to the unpredictability inherent in working with wood or charcoal as a fuel source. But it doesn't have to be that way.

The Memphis Wood Pellet Grill offers the precision temperature control common to indoor ovens. Using wood pellets as a fuel source, in combination with a control system that measures temperature every 2 seconds, the grill provides an accurate way to maintain a consistent cooking level. The small pellets feed into a hopper, and when the system senses that more heat is needed, it adds the necessary amount to the fire.

The ability to maintain a temperature from 180 degrees to 650 degrees allows the grill to be used in a versatile manner. With a greater temperature range than a standard indoor oven, the grill can be used as a smoker or even as a wood-fired oven for creating specialty pizzas. Complete with a digital probe thermometer that communicates with the temperature control system, the grill can monitor cooking time, automatically switching to the lowest setting when the desired internal temperature is reached. So, without skipping a beat, it will be like winter never happened. Almost.

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