Peddling in comfort with Pedego e-bikes

Pedego offers electric bikes in Southern California called Comfort Cruisers.

The women's version of the Comfort Cruiser. Pedego

Editor's note: This post was updated at 8:59 a.m. PDT August 7 to remove the incorrect statement that Pedego is also the maker of the eZee bike.

You have heard of the eZee bike , which is cool but rather expensive. Now there's a slightly more affordable option from Pedego, another electric bike maker, for those who want to be in shape and stay green, but just can't stomach the price tag of the eZee. The new offering is another electric bike, called the Comfort Cruiser, and it costs around $1,600--$400 less than the eZee.

According to Pedego, the Comfort Cruiser is a lightweight bike designed to provide comfortable riding. It has a wide, cushioned seat and a throttle that's controlled by revving the right handlebar grip, similar to that of a motorcycle.

The bike is equipped with a rear-hub motor, which is incorporated inside the rear rim, and a lithium battery that has enough juice to power the bike for about 30 miles at up to 20 miles per hour. The battery is detachable, allowing you to quickly take it off for recharging. Pedego says the battery can go from completely dead to fully charged in 4 hours.

Of course, sans battery, the bike can be used just like a regular bike. You can always power it the traditional way and use the battery power just to ease the pedaling when cycling in rough terrain.

The Pedego Comfort Cruiser bikes are available in two versions, one for men and one for women. Each version comes in 12 color combinations, including black with pink wheels, white with mint green wheels, or orange with orange wheels. The bikes can also be customized with accessories such as baskets, bells, and cup holders.

Currently, Comfort Cruiser bikes are only available in Southern California.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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