Paniq at the Disco...in your jacket

A new wearable electronics system called Paniq lets you control your iPod or other gadget straight from your clothes.

The Paniq controller lets you play, pause, and adjust the volume on your iPod--via the "smart fabric" on your garment. QIO Systems

Sometimes--like when it's freezing out or you're speeding along on your bike--it's not very convenient to take out your gadget and fumble with the controller. A new wearable electronics system called Paniq lets you do the controlling straight from your clothes, which could make things easier (or not).

Paniq controller
The Paniq controller uses a 30-pin connector to link your iPod to Paniqmode interactive duds. QIO Systems

By connecting Paniq modules to Paniqmode interactive garments, you can control your iPod or other gizmo via smart-fabric buttons integrated into the garb.

The Paniq system is not unlike the Zegna iJacket , whose sleeve buttons feature play/pause, volume, off/on and backward/forward track controls.

But given that New York-based QIO Systems, Paniq's maker, has teamed with a range of clothing manufacturers to produce Paniq-compatible garments, you'll have a fair amount of choice when it comes to the smart duds you don. (Partners include Cole Haan, Zoo York, Killa, iQuantum, Celio, Beaucre, and Bailo.)

Paniqmode clothes support electronics including iPods/iPhones, Bluetooth mobile phones, AM/FM radio, and even walkie-talkies. The Paniq controllers cost $20, weight about a tenth of an ounce, and come in several colors and styles. They're available from apparel and electronics retailers, or from Paniq's online store.

Related story:

Zegna's 'iJacket' lets you talk to the coat

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

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