Pandigital debuts kitchen TV with extra perks

Pandigital has a new, multifaceted kitchen LCD TV coming in June.

Pandigital's upcoming 15-inch kitchen set isn't just a TV. Pandigital

Pandigital, which is making a name for itself in the digital photo frame market, is branching out into kitchen televisions. As part of the upcoming International Home and Housewares Show in Chicago, the company will be showing off a new 15-inch LCD HDTV that can display digital photos and act as a digital cookbook.

Here are the highlights and specs from the news release:

  1. TV's resolution is 1280x720.
  2. Preloaded recipes are included. Plus, additional recipes can be copied onto the frame's internal memory.
  3. Copy digital photos onto the frame's memory via the memory card reader or by a connection to Google's Picasa photo sharing Web site.
  4. Messproof design that's sealed with glass, so it's protected from water, oil, flour, and other common ingredients, as well as from spills and splatters.
  5. Comes with a countertop stand and an under-cabinet mount, and is also wall-mountable.
  6. Interchangeable faceplates in brushed stainless, black and white to match various kitchen styles.
  7. 512MB of internal memory stores up to 3,200 pages of recipes or digital photos.
  8. Calendar and clock functions keep customers informed and allow photos, video and music to be programmed for play at specific dates and times.
  9. The alarm function can be set to to noteworthy dates and times, including when it's time for a favorite cooking show.
  10. Integrated 6-in-1 media reader that supports SD, XD, Memory Stick, Memory Stick Pro/Memory Stick Duo, Compact Flash, and MultiMediaCard.
  11. Programmable on and off times.
  12. Support for JPEG, Motion JPEG, MPEG 1, MPEG 4, and AVI.

Pandigital's multifaceted kitchen TV is scheduled to be available in June and carry an MSRP of $399.99.

 

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