Panasonic FX75 is wide, bright, extra Intelligent

Panasonic's new touch-screen ultracompact comes fully loaded for snapshot success.

Panasonic

It's always nice when the highlight of a touch-screen camera isn't the LCD. The Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX75, for example, has a 3-inch touch-screen LCD, but the main attraction is really the lens: a compact ultrawide-angle 24-120mm-equivalent lens with a maximum aperture of f2.2 and a 5x zoom. The 14-megapixel ultracompact features the company's Sonic Speed AF system, too, for fast focusing and low shutter lag.

Unlike some previous FX models, this one doesn't appear to have semimanual or manual shooting modes; it's got a whole lot of automatic and scene modes. Fortunately, Panasonic's Intelligent Auto is fairly reliable. Enter that mode and you get the full suite of iA features: Power O.I.S. image stabilization, Face Recognition, Face Detection, AF Tracking, Intelligent ISO Control, Intelligent Scene Selector, and Intelligent Exposure.

A new Motion Deblur option uses the Intelligent ISO Control and Exposure technologies and combines them with the O.I.S. and f2.2 aperture to help reduce blur from hand shake and subject movement. (Since it's new I can't comment on its abilities, but it sounds like a combo that'll work well.) Also included is Panasonic's Intelligent Resolution technology, which targets outlines, detailed texture areas, and soft gradation in photos and improves them for overall clarity. (This one I have used and it does work.)

The FX75 records movies at resolutions up to 720p at 30 frames per second in AVCHD Lite or Motion JPEG formats. There's a one-touch record button on top and you do get use of the optical zoom while recording. You can also record using one of the camera's many scene modes that include art filters like Pinhole, Film Grain, and Dynamic.

Look for the FX75 in mid-July with a price of $299.95. You can read more about the FX75 on Panasonic's site.

 

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