Ouya game console launch delayed until June 25

The tiny Android device won't be available to consumers until the end of June, three weeks later than initially announced.

Ouya game console
It'll be a little while longer before you can go hands-on with Ouya. Josh Miller/CNET

People eyeing the Ouya game console will have to wait a bit longer to get their hands on one.

The maker of the small Android-based console said Thursday that the product won't reach the consumer market until June 25, three weeks after the initial launch date of June 4. The decision to delay the launch was based on high demand at the retail level, Ouya CEO Julie Uhrman revealed in the following statement sent to CNET:

We've had incredibly positive reactions from our retailer partners. So, in order to meet greater-than-expected demand, we decided to shift our launch date by a mere three weeks in order to produce additional units. We want to make sure everyone who wants an Ouya can easily order or pick one up on launch day.

Uhrman also revealed that the company is fixing an issue with the console's controller buttons, which can sometimes get stuck under the faceplate. New controllers will sport larger button holes, so consumers who receive the console starting in June won't run into the problem.

Selling for $99, the cube-size game console can run open-source Android games when connected to a TV or monitor, a prospect that's excited the gaming community. The touchpad-based controller adds an extra $49 to the price tag. Equipped with an Nvidia Tegra-3 processor, Ouya can run 3D games in 1,080-pixel high-definition resolution.

The open-source concept makes Ouya unique. Every game is free to try, and any developer can create and publish a game. More than 12,000 people have already signed up to design games, according to the company.

Ouya has been shipping to folks who funded its development through Kickstarter donations. Other buyers have been able to preorder the device since February , from Ouya itself and from select retailers.

Come June 25, the console is expected to be available in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. through Amazon, Best Buy, GAME, GameStop, Target, and of course Ouya directly.

Ouya has also picked up extra cash to produce enough units to meet the heavy retail demand and fund the ongoing development of its console.

The company announced Thursday that it raised $15 million in new funding from a group led by investment firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Bing Gordon, a general partner with KPCB, will also join Ouya's board of directors.

"Ouya's open-source platform creates a new world of opportunity for established and emerging independent game creators and gamers alike," Gordon said in a statement. "There are some types of games that can only be experienced on a TV, and Ouya is squarely focused on bringing back the living room gaming experience. Ouya will allow game developers to unleash their most creative ideas and satisfy gamers craving a new kind of experience."

Update, 9:35 a.m. PT: Adds response from Ouya.

Read the full CNET Review

Ouya Game Console

The Bottom Line: Despite its low price and free-to-try system, the Ouya fails to reach its potential as a disruptive alternative platform. / Read full review

About the author

Journalist, software trainer, and Web developer Lance Whitney writes columns and reviews for CNET, Computer Shopper, Microsoft TechNet, and other technology sites. His first book, "Windows 8 Five Minutes at a Time," was published by Wiley & Sons in November 2012.

 

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