Oracle: "Our virtualization is god!...a small one...sort of a demi-god...or not"

Oracle isn't getting much love from analysts on its virtualization hype.

Oracle has a history of making BIG announcements about how much better its technology is, how it will crush feeble-minded competitors, and such. Its history of actual delivery is somewhat less grandiose. While Oracle has demonstrated an exceptional ability and voracious appetite for acquiring others' innovation, it has proved less adept at actually building things that are dramatically better than the opposition's.

A case in point may well be its virtualization technology, which it trumpeted as three times more efficient than rival products. But as Larry Dignan notes, analysts aren't buying the hype this time around. Oracle's crying wolf over Unbreakable Linux may well be the most immediate reason:

Oracle on Monday announced its own server virtualization software and claimed it was three times more efficient than rival products. VMware shares were whacked on the news. What a difference a day makes. On Tuesday, analysts called Oracle?s virtualization announcement "virtual FUD" and noted it was reminiscent to the company?s Unbreakable Linux announcement a year ago....

But Oracle's big announcement doesn't point to VMware's demise, say analysts. In fact, the reaction to Oracle?s virtualization claims was harsh. Simply put, few observers are buying Oracle's claims.

Oracle has declared itself savior of the content management world on several separate occasions...with only a rounding error in market share to show for it. It has thumped its chest about getting into the Linux business...only to make no noticeable impact on Red Hat, Novell, or really more than a handful of customers. And so on.

Oracle does hubris very well. It does acquisitions/consolidation very well. It's probably best if the company sticks to what it does well, and gives customers a reprieve on everything else.

Tags:
Tech Culture
About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

    Join the discussion

    Conversation powered by Livefyre

    Don't Miss
    Hot Products
    Trending on CNET

    HOT ON CNET

    Is your phone battery always at 4 percent?

    These battery packs will give your device the extra juice to power through all of those texts and phone calls.