Oracle: "Our virtualization is god!...a small one...sort of a demi-god...or not"

Oracle isn't getting much love from analysts on its virtualization hype.

Oracle has a history of making BIG announcements about how much better its technology is, how it will crush feeble-minded competitors, and such. Its history of actual delivery is somewhat less grandiose. While Oracle has demonstrated an exceptional ability and voracious appetite for acquiring others' innovation, it has proved less adept at actually building things that are dramatically better than the opposition's.

A case in point may well be its virtualization technology, which it trumpeted as three times more efficient than rival products. But as Larry Dignan notes, analysts aren't buying the hype this time around. Oracle's crying wolf over Unbreakable Linux may well be the most immediate reason:

Oracle on Monday announced its own server virtualization software and claimed it was three times more efficient than rival products. VMware shares were whacked on the news. What a difference a day makes. On Tuesday, analysts called Oracle?s virtualization announcement "virtual FUD" and noted it was reminiscent to the company?s Unbreakable Linux announcement a year ago....

But Oracle's big announcement doesn't point to VMware's demise, say analysts. In fact, the reaction to Oracle?s virtualization claims was harsh. Simply put, few observers are buying Oracle's claims.

Oracle has declared itself savior of the content management world on several separate occasions...with only a rounding error in market share to show for it. It has thumped its chest about getting into the Linux business...only to make no noticeable impact on Red Hat, Novell, or really more than a handful of customers. And so on.

Oracle does hubris very well. It does acquisitions/consolidation very well. It's probably best if the company sticks to what it does well, and gives customers a reprieve on everything else.

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