Openfilm unites filmmakers via social media

Online hub started by actor and filmmaker Scott Caan looks to bring indie movie types together using social media and other tech resources.

Openfilm, a new Web site and online hub for independent filmmakers, hopes to combine social-media technology with streaming video, online conferences, and other resources to bring like-minded created types together from around the world.

It's backed by Scott Caan, star of the TV series "Hawaii Five-O" and "Entourage." As a director and indie filmmaker himself, he's the advocate of non-studio features, shorts, online movies, and other Hollywood outsider products. To kick off hype for the new site this past week, Scott participated in a live streaming conference at the LA Film School hosted by Michael Buckley, host of the You Tube series "What the Buck."

One of the main attractions at the new hub is the Web series "Openfilm Live." On each episode, amateur, aspiring, and online filmmakers from around the world can ride their Twitter accounts into the show and ask guest filmmakers like Caan about the indie business, new moviemaking technology, editing software, HD video, film festivals, online outlets, and any other relevant topic.

For those wannabe Hitchcocks or Nolans out there, there's not much piled up at Openfilm that can't theoretically be found elsewhere with a few Google searches. But the intention here is to build a community.

There's also a growing resource list for musicians looking to get their unsigned work into the marketplace. It's all a well-intentioned effort to do a social-media age end-around past the Hollywood gatekeepers--the same execs who can't figure out why online streaming and Internet distribution is outstripping their business models.

Roll it, Openfilm.

Featured Video

Why do so many of us still buy cars with off-road abilities?

Cities are full of cars like the Subaru XV that can drive off-road but will never see any challenging terrain. What drives us to buy cars with these abilities when we don't really need them most of the time?

by Drew Stearne