Nvidia, Rambus settle patent dispute

Patent litigation between Rambus and Nvidia has been settled, the two companies said, without providing much in the way of detail.

Nvidia and Rambus have settled a longstanding patent license dispute.

The agreement covers a "broad range" of chip products offered by Nvidia and settles all outstanding claims, including resolution of past use of Rambus' patented innovations, the companies said. The term of the agreement is five years.

Though neither financial nor technological details were disclosed, the dispute between the two companies has not exactly been private.

In 2008, Rambus sued Nvidia, accusing the graphics chip supplier of violating 17 Rambus-held patents on memory controllers . At that time, Rambus claimed that chipsets, graphics processers, and media communication processors across six different Nvidia product lines were illegally infringing on its patents.

The patents cited by Rambus at the time covered memory controllers associated with particular kinds of memory technologies including SDR, DDR, DDR2, DDR3, GDDR, and GDDR3 SDRAM.

Apparently, this has been settled. "Looking forward, we have the opportunity to focus on developing innovative solutions in concert with our licensees to help bring compelling, innovative products to market," Rambus said in a statement.

Rambus has overreached at least one previous patent dispute. Micron Technology prevailed in an important multi-billion dollar lawsuit brought against it and others by Rambus, a company not shy about suing memory chipmakers. At that time, Rambus saw its stock price nosedive as a result.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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