Now on News.com: The making of Maker Faire

Extreme crafting, the future of making, how to make money with open-source hardware kits, and much more.

Two days before the third annual Bay Area edition of Maker Faire, the few art projects in place were only partly done. Here, the Neverwas Haul, a steam-powered, mobile, Victorian house, waits to be completed. Daniel Terdiman/CNET News.com

SAN MATEO, Calif.--The best thing about going to Maker Faire a couple of days before the gates officially open is watching it grow.

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Walk a couple of times around the fairgrounds here, where the do-it-yourself bacchanalia will welcome tens of thousands of people starting Saturday, and you'll see new projects appear each time you go around: A stream of trucks keeps coming through the gates, each one hauling a new group of people and whatever fantastical art, heavy machine, oddball musical instrument or other insane contents it might be carrying.

This was Maker Day, a day for the many, many makers whose individual DIY projects are Maker Faire to meet and greet and hear a series of talks on issues near and dear to their hearts: extreme crafting, the future of making, how to make money with open-source hardware kits, and much more. And to see these projects come to life.

Get a behind-the-scenes tour in the full report on News.com.

 

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