North Korea behind March cyberattack, says South Korea

The South is now blaming the North for a hacking attack targeted at banks and TV stations.

South Korea has accused North Korea of launching a recent cyberattack that hit tens of thousands of PCs.

A spokesman for South Korea's Internet agency said today that six computers in North Korea were identified as the source of the attack, according to The Guardian. Those computers used more than 1,000 IP addresses from across the world to infect 48,000 PCs and servers at South Korean banks and broadcasting stations.

The spokesman told the Associated Press that the attack mimicked past hacking attempts by North Korea and pointed the finger at an espionage agency run by the military. The attack also seemed to have been in the planning stage for around eight months.

"We saw evidence that the attack was extremely carefully prepared," the spokesman said at a news briefing today.

South Korea initially named China as the source of the hack , saying that the attack originated from an IP address located in China. A day later, South Korea backed away from those charges, admitting that the IP address was used internally by one of the targeted banks and simply matched one registered in China .

Tension has been running high between the two countries with North Korea threatening to wage war and fire missiles against its southern neighbor. South Korea's foreign minister said today he believes the possibility of a missile attack from the North is "very high."

About the author

Journalist, software trainer, and Web developer Lance Whitney writes columns and reviews for CNET, Computer Shopper, Microsoft TechNet, and other technology sites. His first book, "Windows 8 Five Minutes at a Time," was published by Wiley & Sons in November 2012.

 

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