Nissan shows off new hybrid, electric vehicle and fuel cell stack

Nissan shows off a bevy of new, environmentally sounds technologies as part of its GT 2012 plan.

Nissan's hybrid test car
Nissan tests out its new hybrid system. Nissan

At this year's New York auto show, Nissan showed off an electric vehicle concept and committed to developing one for production. This week, Nissan demonstrated it was doing more than blowing smoke by showing off its electric research vehicle, a prototype of its new hybrid system, and a new fuel cell that costs less while offering greater power density.

Nissan expects to offer an electric vehicle by 2010, with mass market production in 2012. The current vehicle being shown is similar to the concept Denki Cube from the New York auto show and is merely a research vehicle to develop the electric powertrain.

Nissan fuel cell stack
Nissan's new fuel cell delivers more power and costs less. Nissan

The new hybrid system is of greater interest, as Nissan's current Altima Hybrid relies on technology licensed from Toyota. Nissan's system is designed for a rear-wheel-drive car and uses two clutches, doing away with a torque converter for more efficient power use. Nissan hasn't released any details on performance yet, or when it might offer a car with this technology.

Nissan's new fuel cell stack, part of its ongoing research into fuel cell powertrains that generate electricity from hydrogen, uses half the amount of platinum as previous fuel cells, which reduces cost. Nissan says it has increased the power output from 90 to 130 kilowatts, which would allow for more powerful electric motors. The new fuel cell is also 33 percent smaller than the previous generation.

About the author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.

 

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