New Sony home theater systems for 2007

Sony's three new component-based home theater systems offer affordable pricing and full-size A/V receivers with plenty of A/V inputs.

Sony HT-7100DH
Sony HT-7100DH Sony


Sony's new line of Bravia home theater systems may be turning heads, but the company is also debuting a troika of more traditional, component-based home-theater-in-a-box systems (HTIBs). Two of the three systems don't include DVD players (so you're not paying extra for something you already own). And while these systems may not have the slick look of the Bravia line, the inclusion of a full-scale A/V receiver offers the flexibility of more A/V inputs.

Sony HT-DDW790
Sony HT-DDW790 Sony

The "HT" line is composed of three products: the HT-DDW790 ($200, March), the HT-DDW990 ($300, May), and the HT-7100DH ($500, March), all of which are 5.1-channel products with an 8-inch subwoofer. Each system includes the same Digital Cinema Auto Calibration (DCAC) feature found in the Bravia home theater systems--it utilizes the included microphone to automatically adjust the speaker levels to the vagaries of your room at the touch of a button.

Sony HT-DDW990
Sony HT-DDW990 Sony

In addition to a standard allotment of component video and digital audio inputs, the HT-DDW990 and HT-7100DH each include two HDMI inputs and one output, as well as Sony's Digital Media Port. That proprietary jack allows consumers to interface with any one of four accessories (sold separately) that provide connectivity to iPods, Bluetooth-enabled audio devices (such as Sony Ericsson's Walkman music phones), streaming network audio, or Sony's own Network Walkman portable music player. In addition to being XM-ready, the HT-7100DH is the only one of the three to include a DVD player--a 5-disc DVD changer with 720p/1080i upscaling via HDMI.

About the author

John P. Falcone is the executive editor of CNET Reviews, where he coordinates a group of more than 20 editors and writers based in New York and San Francisco as they cover the latest and greatest products in consumer technology. He's been a CNET editor since 2003.

 

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