New Olympus SLR pictures sneaking out

If the photos are anything to judge by, a new Olympus SLR will have an articulating LCD and be called the E-3.

My Korean isn't even good enough to call appalling, but fortunately for me, some Web site pictures of what sure looks like a new Olympus E-3 SLR speak louder than the surrounding words.

A new Olympus SLR SLRclub

A variety of shots posted at one Web site and another show some interesting new features of an SLR higher up the line than the E-510 and E-410 introduced earlier this year.

The pictures label the camera as the E-3. That's a different name from an anonymously posted document that used the name E-P1 , but it's unclear what the naming implications are. Olympus said in March that it will introduce this year a successor to the current top-end model, the E-1, which went on sale in 2003.

Judging from the photos, the camera comes with a fold-out LCD screen, doubtless a handy feature for shooting pictures above one's head or down by the ground. Olympus' live view technology, which now is showing up in cameras from SLR leaders Nikon and Canon, would be necessary for such a screen to be useful.

The camera also sports an add-on battery grip, image stabilization and a pop-up flash. And unsurprisingly, it uses the Four-Thirds lens mount system, which means lens compatibility with Panasonic SLRs as well.

Olympus didn't immediately respond to requests for comment.

According to some rough-and-ready translations, the camera has dual xD and CompactFlash memory card support, sports a 12-60mm lens (the equivalent of 24-120mm in 35mm film camera terms), and will be available in November.

(Via the Online Photographer and Softpedia.)

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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