New Intel chip could mean $125B for PC biz

Intel CEO says Sandy Bridge will generate over $125 billion in revenue for the PC industry in a shift to processor-based graphics.

LAS VEGAS--Intel CEO Paul Otellini said its newest processor, dubbed Sandy Bridge , will generate one-third of total corporate revenue as the chipmaker pushes "processor graphics" as the new PC standard.

Intel CEO Paul Otellini said Intel's Sandy Bridge chip creates new processor graphics PC standard.
Intel CEO Paul Otellini said Intel's Sandy Bridge chip creates new 'processor graphics' PC standard. Brooke Crothers

"Sandy Bridge will represent over one-third of Intel's corporate revenues this year. And will generate over $125 billion of revenue for the PC industry. This is a huge, huge product," said Otellini speaking at the roll out of its 2nd Generation Intel Core processor family.

And this new family of processors is enough of a change from previous products to justify those numbers, according to Otellini. "This is next evolution of the PC...We've shifted to processor-based graphics," he said.

That means Intel is now putting the core of the personal computer--the main processor, graphics and media engines, and memory components--all on one chip.

All of that integration means better performance. "With a Sandy Bridge laptop you can now convert a four-minute HD video from a laptop to a phone or an iPad in 16 seconds," Otellini said, as an example of a task that used to take many minutes and can now be done much, much faster.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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