Netgear Powerline adapter comes with power socket

Netgear's new Powerline HD Plus adapters come with a pass-though power socket for power outlet-constrained homes.

Powerline adapters generally don't work with power strips or surge protectors, needing to be plugged directly into the wall socket. This would be a problem if you have only one power outlet at the remote corner of the house where you want to put that home server.

The HDXB111 Netgear

This is why it's rather significant that Netgear introduced on Monday its new Powerline HD Plus Ethernet Adapter Kit that has a pass-through power socket. This really comes in handy in homes with a limited number of power outlets.

Other than that, the UPA-based Powerline HD offers network connections up to 200Mbps over existing electrical wires. This means you can bring your Internet and stream high-def content from anywhere there's a power outlet.

The kit has a plug-in design for easy setup. However, this design also means the adapter might obstruct other power sockets near by, unlike the more space-conscious extension-cord design that Cisco introduced awhile ago .

The Powerline HD Plus Ethernet Adapter Kit contains two identical Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters (HDXB111); each offers only one 10/100 Ethernet port. This is rather disappointing, because you'll need a separate switch if you want to add more than one network device at the remote corner. The Cisco adapter, on the other hand, offers up to four ports.

One more thing: the Netgear Powerline HD Plus's network port caps at 100Mbps, which is half of the speed that Negear claims the adapter can deliver.

The Powerline HD Plus Ethernet Adapter Kit comes with a one-year warranty and is available now for $170. Netgear also offers the Powerline AV Ethernet Adapter Kit, which has the same specs minus the pass-though power socket and costs $150.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews 3D printers, networking/storage devices, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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