Netatmo Rain Gauge puts rainfall stats on your smartphone

Gardening aficionados take note, this add-on module for Netatmo's Weather Station is designed to keep track of precipitation.

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Netatmo

"Have you ever seen the rain?" Creedence Clearwater Revival sang. Well, not only have we seen it, we've monitored it on our smartphones via a Wi-Fi-enabled precipitation sensor. Which is surely what Creedence meant to sing.

Netatmo's Rain Gauge is a newly-available accessory for the company's Personal Weather Station, which tracks environmental changes inside or outside your home, measuring humidity and air quality among other things.

The extra module attaches to a standard screw, Netatmo says, and is at home in your garden, or gathering rainfall in a balcony. It connects to the Weather Station over Wi-Fi, letting you track the amount of rainfall per hour, or how much precipitation there's been over a longer stretch of time. You can also set up custom alerts that will let you know when the sensors register rainfall -- letting you know it's time to dash home and take the washing in.

Only works with Weather Station

The Rain Gauge can be pre-ordered as of today for $79, (or £59 if you're in the UK), though expect to wait 15 days before it ships. Sadly, it only works with the Weather Station -- which costs a much heftier $179 -- and you can only associate one Rain Gauge with each Weather Station.

The accessory could be of interest to horticultural types who enjoy monitoring their garden from afar, however, and is part of a growing smart home trend that sees high-tech tracking features used to give us new data about our everyday lives. Netatmo has form in this area, revealing the sun-monitoring 'June' wristband in January. For another example of life-monitoring tech, check out our video of the 'Mother' system, embedded below.

Are you interested in Netatmo's Rain Gauge? Pour your thoughts into the comments.

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